• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • Áñez looks North to the United States, from which she requested 350 visas for her fraudulent coup government officials after Luis Arce's resounding victory in Bolivia's recent presidential elections. La Paz, Bolivia. October 18, 2020.

    Áñez looks North to the United States, from which she requested 350 visas for her fraudulent coup government officials after Luis Arce's resounding victory in Bolivia's recent presidential elections. La Paz, Bolivia. October 18, 2020. | Photo: EFE/Joédson Alves

Published 23 October 2020
Opinion

With the victory of the Movement Towards Socialism (MAS) in the Bolivian elections on October 18, the de facto coup government presided over by Jeanine Áñez, has requested visas from the United States for its officials according to a US-based network.

NBC news network journalist Tom Brokaw reported Thursday on a letter from Jeanine Áñez, in which he has requested 350 visas from the U.S. government for officials of his de facto coup government.

The report, cited by the communication platform Resumen Latinoamericano, indicates that the reason behind the request is the concern that the Bolivian de facto government has about being prosecuted by the government of President-elect Luis Arce Catacora.

RELATED:

Bolivia's Regime Opens to Foreign NGOs & Intervention

The news has gone viral on social networks under the title: "Time to Escape?"

On Sunday, the candidate of the Movement Towards Socialism (MAS), Luis Arce, managed to win the first round of elections in Bolivia, elections that took place 363 days after the coup d'état orchestrated by the opposition and supported by the US, after which Evo Morales resigned as President of the country.

This triumph has been possible despite the efforts of the de facto government of Jeanine Áñez, which was installed after the coup d'état of November 2019, to perpetuate itself in the government with measures such as the postponement of the elections and repression of MAS leaders and sympathizers. 

Despite her attempts to prevent the return to power of the MAS in Bolivia, Áñez has even been forced to recognize Morales' party's resounding victory in the elections, thus ending her mandate with several unfulfilled promises and acts of crime and violence.

Now, the MAS has returned to power, after a year, with the commitment to resolve the serious problems that afflict the Andean nation, above all the economic crisis.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.