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News > Bolivia

Bolivia’s Regime Opens to Foreign NGOs & Intervention

  • Jeanine Añez presents the Supreme Decree to enable NGO's in the country. October 2, 2020.

    Jeanine Añez presents the Supreme Decree to enable NGO's in the country. October 2, 2020. | Photo: Twitter / @KawsachunNews

Published 3 October 2020
Opinion

The Supreme Decree ends rules enacted by Morales which restricted NGO’s from intervening in domestic politics.

Bolivia’s Jeanine Añez has lifted restrictions on foreign Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s) in a reversal of the pro-sovereignty policy previously implemented by President Evo Morales.

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Supreme Decree 4353 ends rules which had been enacted by Morales in order to restrict NGO’s, particularly the usual influx of those from the United States, from intervening in domestic politics.

Añez presented the decree on Friday, October 2, saying, "Today we open Bolivia to the world, to contact with Western democracies, and particularly those devoted to freedom,"

The coup leader also took to twitter, “This regulation will make it possible to streamline procedures, enabling greater coordination with NGOs.”

NGO’s played a pivotal role in the coup against Morales, in a process which spanned years. Such groups were able to funnel financing to on the ground actors from the exterior.

Examples of pipeline which pours money into reactionary ground forces can be found around coup activist Jhanisse Vaca Daza, with links to Human Rights Foundation and the Oslo Freedom Forum, and who founded her own group in Bolivia “Standing Rivers” (Rio de Pie)—a liberal front which purports to work in the interest of the environment—with absolutely no connection to any Bolivian social sectors or any movement.

Such groups took aim at the MAS government on false claims framed as human rights issues and notably, during the Chiquitania fires in 2019. Thousands of hectares have burned under the Añez regime but groups which claim to work in the interest of the environment have been silent.

It became clear following the November 2019 coup, that NGO-backed operatives were using social justice language and progressive issues to subvert Bolivia’s government and Morales’ re-election campaign.

Many actors received direct or indirect funding from the U.S. Department of State via the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) to operate for neoliberal interests.

Morales has proudly stated that unions and grassroots movements have relied on their rank and file and never depended on NGOs.

The Movement Towards Socialism leader has said that NGO’s don’t actually defend the Indigenous Movement or Mother Earth. They and other foundations use the Indigenous and environmental movement for their benefit and serve as imperial instruments to loot and intervene in countries and ultimately to defend the interests of imperialist transnationals.

Bolivia's post-coup elections are just two weeks away and its expect that the regime will continue to push through numerous last-minute laws as it also works to, by any means necessary, prevent the MAS from retaking power.

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