• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • President Luis Arce (L) receives credentials from Spain's Ambassador Francisco Gasso (R), Jan. 11, La Paz, Bolivia, 2021.

    President Luis Arce (L) receives credentials from Spain's Ambassador Francisco Gasso (R), Jan. 11, La Paz, Bolivia, 2021. | Photo: Twitter/ @LuchoXBolivia

Published 11 January 2021
Opinion

Their relations were maintained at the Charge d'Affaires level following the expulsion of Spanish diplomats by the Añez regime in 2019.

Bolivia's President Luis Arce on Monday received the credentials of Spain's Ambassador Francisco Gasso, thus putting an end to diplomatic tensions experienced since the U.S.-backed coup led by Jeanine Añez in 2019. 

RELATED: 

Bolivia Identifies 7 Suspects Related to Sacaba Massacre

The appointment of the Spanish ambassador comes after several months without diplomatic relations between both countries as a result of the expulsion of the Charge d'Affaires and Consul officers in December 2019.

The Spanish government also ordered "in reciprocity to the hostile gesture" the expulsion of three Bolivian diplomats, among them the Charge d'Affaires Luis Quispe.

Having served as an advisor to Spain's Mission to the United Nations in New York and as Charge d'Affaires in Bolivia since October last year, Gasso replaced former ambassador Emilio Perez.

The Añez regime accused some Spanish diplomats of trying to access "clandestinely" Mexico's embassy in La Paz where a group of ex-officials was requesting asylum. Mexico's ambassador Maria Mercado was also expelled.

It also broke diplomatic relations with Venezuela on Nov. 15, 2019, and with Cuba on Jan. 24, 2020, due to alleged "hostilities and aggressions". Likewise, it was announced the closure of embassies in Nicaragua and Iran.

Having taken office, Arce's administration restored diplomatic ties with Venezuela, Cuba, Iran, and Nicaragua.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.