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  • Some striking figures reveal that 70 percent of the femicides happened inside the victim´s home and 33 percent of them had already denounced they were suffering violence.

    Some striking figures reveal that 70 percent of the femicides happened inside the victim´s home and 33 percent of them had already denounced they were suffering violence. | Photo: AFP/ E. Abramovich

Published 3 July 2020
Opinion

 The report shows that in 180 days, 160 children lost their mother.

From January to June 2020, 162 femicides were committed in Argentina, counting for a gender-base hate crime every 27 hours, according to a report by the Observatory of Gender Violence Now That They See Us on Friday.

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The report is based on surveys of visual and digital media from all over the country and registers killings during the first half of the up to June 30. Out of the 162 femicides perpetrated, 81 occurred during the quarantine that was imposed in the country due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some striking figures reveal that 70 percent of the femicides happened inside the victim's home, and 33 percent of them had already denounced they were suffering violence.

The surveys from local news outlets highlight that in 69 percent of the cases, the murderer was the partner or ex-partner of the victim, while 12 percent of the offenders were relatives.

The data shows more than half the total, 87 cases, ranged 21 to 40 years old. Moreover, 23% died of a knife wound, 20% as a result of the blows, 15% by suffocation, 10% burned, and 18% by firearm.

Besides, the province of Buenos Aires registered most killings, 63, followed by Santa Fe with 19, Tucumán with 12, Córdoba with 9, alongside other 18 areas.

In January 2020, Roberto Valent, the United Nations (UN) Resident Coordinator in Argentina, recalled in the organization news site that the Argentinian government had taken significant steps to tackle gender violence.

Some measures include ensuring that national laws follow international standards; enlisting the support of Argentina's civil society and women's movement; passing the Micaela Law to educate government workers on the problem of violence against women, and the Brisa Law to provide financial reparation for children of femicide victims, Valent said.

However, there are many challenges ahead, as many of the women remain silent on their suffering. In 2018 alone, the hotline created to assist women who suffer from violence received 169,014 calls.

"Eight out of every ten women calling the hotline reported they had been abused for more than one year; four out of 10 reported that they had been the silent victims of violence for over five years, and eight out of 10 reported abuse by their current or former partners" the UN official revealed.

 

    

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