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  • Protestors rally on Sixty street in the east of the capital Khartoum, on June 30, 2020

    Protestors rally on Sixty street in the east of the capital Khartoum, on June 30, 2020 | Photo: AFP

Published 30 June 2020
Opinion

The so-called  “million-man march” was convened by the Sudanese Professionals’ Association and the Resistance Committees

Thousands of Sudanese protestors Tuesday took back the streets in several cities to demand justice for the people killed by security forces during last year’s demonstrations and further political reforms following 2019 uprising against former ruler Omar al-Bashir.

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As police used tear gas to disperse those marching on a road leading to the airport in the capital, Khartoum, some local media outlets reports that the demonstrations were peaceful.

The so-called “million-man march” was convened by the Sudanese Professionals’ Association, and the Resistance Committees, organizations that played a major role during last year's rebellion.

After almost 30 years in power, former President Omar al-Bashir was deposed in the aftermath of street protests throughout Sudan, which started in 2018 and peaked on April 11, 2019, when al-Bashir was arrested by the military.

During his term, the country which remained under siege by the U.S. suffered an economic collapse that tried to tackle by imposing emergency austerity measures and a sharp currency devaluation that sparked uprisings all over the country over living standards.

After Omar al-Bashir´s ruling ended, an agreement was reached by which a transitional government called Sovereignty Council of Sudan would lead the country until Nov. 22 general elections. The council appointed Abdalla Hamdok as Prime Minister during the transitional period.

Tuesday's protests demand justice over the killings during 2019 as well as handed over major files to the military, which under the deal, were meant to oversee security issues and not other aspects such as the economy.

Demonstrators also called for swift, public trials for al-Bashir and top officials in his government as well as the appointment of civilian governors for Sudan's provinces which were disintegrated by al-Bashir.

During a speech on Monday, Prime Minister Hamdok said such demands are “legitimate” and “necessary to correct the revolution’s track.”

   

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