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  • Lebanon's Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri speaks during a news conference in Beirut, Lebanon October 29, 2019.

    Lebanon's Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri speaks during a news conference in Beirut, Lebanon October 29, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 29 October 2019

Lebanon has been gripped by unprecedented nationwide anti-government protests. Hariri called on all Lebanese to protect civil peace.

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri announced on Tuesday that he was headed to the Baabda Palace to submit his cabinet's resignation to President Michel Aoun "after having reached a dead-end, and sensing the need for a positive shock.”

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During his brief speech, which began at 4 P.M. (local time), Hariri addressed the ongoing protests and the issues plaguing the country.

Hariri said that his government had reached a "dead end" and could no longer function cohesively amid immense pressure from protesters. 

On Tuesday, the Lebanese banks announced that they would remain closed until further notice. The Association of Lebanese Banks said banks were keen to ensure pubic and private sector workers would receive their salaries.

While the banks remained closed, hundreds of thousands of protesters continued to fill the streets of every major city in Lebanon as the calls for the regime's resignations continued. 

The Lebanese police and the military are dispatching additional troops to the center of the ongoing unrest to restore order in the capital.

The Lebanese protests began thirteen days ago when hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets to demonstrate against the government and their intent to impose a US$6 tax on the mobile application WhatsApp. 

Despite promises of new reforms, the Lebanese government, headed by Prime Minister Hariri, were unable to convince the protesters to end these demonstrations. 

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