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  • FARC Party Members March to Bogota, Colombia, Oct. 22. 2020

    FARC Party Members March to Bogota, Colombia, Oct. 22. 2020 | Photo: Twitter / @Csivi_Farc

Published 23 October 2020
Opinion

In the first 9 months of 2020, at least 50 former FARC combatants have been assassinated.

Hundreds of former Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas marched from the municipality of Mesetas, in Meta Department, to protest against the targeted killing of 234 of their fellow FARC party members since the signing of the Peace Agreement.

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The march for “Life and Peace” was organized by members of the Revolutionary Alternative Forces of the Commons (FARC), which became a legal political party after their demobilization process as part of the peace accords.

The peaceful demonstration comes days after the assassination of Juan de Jesus Monroy and his personal bodyguard, Luis Alexander Largo, on October 16 in Mesetas, Meta. 

Many former FARC combatants joined the march from other regions of the country, carrying signs saying “We are fulfilling (the peace process) but they are killing us.”

Others joined in as part of the broader social protest taking place across Colombia against the government of Right-wing President Ivan Duque and his social and economic policies.

Colombia has seen a major increase in political violence since President Duque took office in 2018, with hundreds of social leaders and former FARC combatants selectively killed with impunity. In the first 9 months of 2020, at least 50 former FARC combatants have been assassinated, including two women.

“In 2020, nearly 30 percent of all targeted killings have taken place near reincorporation zones, which are mostly located in rural and isolated areas”, concluded the UN report.

As they peacefully make their way to Colombia’s capital city, these demobilized fighters continue their struggle for peace as they ask for solidarity from the international community.

The former combatants also want to pressure the Colombian government to guarantee their physical integrity and rights of political participation, as written in the 2016 peace accords.

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