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  • A group of climate activists attend a news conference at U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2019

    A group of climate activists attend a news conference at U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2019 | Photo: Reuters

Published 19 September 2019

The international #climatestrike is underway in Australia with thousands at rally. The strike will last from Sept. 20-27, coinciding with annual high-level U.N. General Assembly meetings in NYC.

With the United Nations Climate Action Summit set to begin next week in New York, millions of activists around the world have already begun massive demonstrations for the #climatestrike to take place Sept. 20-27.  

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The demonstration, which begin Friday, are to demand that urgent actions be taken against global warming and the drastic climate change taking place across the globe. 

The climate strike was inspired and organized by climate activist Greta Thunberg who, just one year ago, began protesting by herself outside the parliament of her native Sweden to demand policy-makers to take immediate action to mitigate Earth’s rising temperatures. The small act has since galvanized millions to demand the same and has earned which have since earned the 16-year-old a Nobel Peace Prize nomination.

The climate strike is planned to take place in 150 countries and where it is already Sept. 20 activists are out en masse. 

"Soon the sun will rise on Friday the 20th of September 2019. Good luck Australia, The Philippines, Japan and all the Pacific Islands. You go first!" Thunberg said on her Instragram account, Thursday. Over Twitter, Thunberg wrote, “Incredible pictures as Australia’s gathering for the #climatestrike. This is the huge crowd building up in Sydney. Australia is setting the standard!”

The strike was strategically scheduled to coincide not only with the U.N. climate summit on Friday, but for the duration of the 74th session of the U.N. General Assembly meetings in New York City that will be attended by hundreds of world leaders and diplomats and end Sept 30.

New York’s education officials already said they will pardon the absences of any of the 1.1 million public school students who want to participate.

Global warming caused by heat-trapping greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels has already led to droughts and heatwaves, melting glaciers, rising sea levels and floods, scientists say.

Carbon emissions climbed a record high last year, despite a warning from the U.N.-backed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in October that output of the gases must be slashed over the next 12 years to stabilize the climate.

Organizers said the demonstrations would take different forms, but all aim to promote awareness of climate change and to, namely reduce these emissions.

On Wednesday, Thunberg appeared before several committees of the United States Congress, submitting the 2018 IPCC report that urges rapid, unprecedented changes in the way people live to keep temperatures from rising 1.5C by 2030.

"I want you to unite behind the science. And then I want you to take action," she told the U.S. leaders, many of who continue to deny that global temperatures are rising due to human causes.

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