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  • The project will now go to the House of Lords, which in the coming days will give it a final sanction.

    The project will now go to the House of Lords, which in the coming days will give it a final sanction. | Photo: Reuters

Published 9 January 2020

The approval of the Lower House comes after three and a half years of negotiations to finalize the departure of Britain from the European Union (EU), after the referendum.

The House of Commons formally endorsed the Brexit agreement on Thursday, with 330 votes in favor and 231 against, so next week the House of Lords will discuss it and finally bring the process to an end before January 31st deadline.

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The approval of the Lower House comes after three and a half years of negotiations to finalize the departure of  Britain from the European Union (EU), after the referendum.

Support for Brexit's final agreement was planned after the election victory of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson last month, who succeeded where his predecessor, Theresa May, had repeatedly failed, the Conservative Party leader saw his EU-agreed framework for leaving the European body.

Meanwhile, he continues his agenda of meetings to advance new trade negotiations with allied countries. This Thursday the British PM met with Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission (EC).

However, while Britain's millions of pro-Europeans lament Brexit's passage through the Commons, Scotland remains a tricky proposition for Johnson.

"The most obvious effect [of the Bill] is that it removes any doubt over whether Brexit will actually happen, and therefore ensures that the 'casus belli' for a second independence referendum will remain in place," prominent Scottish independence-supporting blogger James Kelly told Al Jazeera News Agency.

Also, Labour's Paul Blomfield, lamented the bill's inevitable passage, and particularly the Conservative government's refusal on Wednesday to restore child refugee protection rights into the Brexit agreement.

He described it a "heartless move" and said guarantees over the rights of unaccompanied child refugees to be reunited with family residing in the UK would not be included in the legislation.

"Johnson has taken a party and a government that was on the edge of a nervous breakdown in the summer of 2019 to an overall majority in a legislature than now stands little chance of stopping it doing pretty much whatever it wants," Tim Bale, professor of politics at Queen Mary University of London, expressed.

The project will now go to the House of Lords, which in the coming days will give it a final sanction. Queen Elizabeth II is expected to promulgate the law between January 22nd and 23rd.

The United Kingdom will be free to leave the EU on January 31st, when the last extension granted to the country expires.

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