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  • Brazil players celebrate a goal during the World Cup in Valenciennes, France, June 21, 2019.

    Brazil players celebrate a goal during the World Cup in Valenciennes, France, June 21, 2019. | Photo: EFE

Published 7 September 2020
Opinion

Every player will receive equal daily rates and prize money when playing with the national squad.

The Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) rocked the world of soccer with the announcement that both men and women will have equal income.

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CBF President Rogerio Caboclo said that "since March this year, the Confederation has equaled the prize money and daily rates between men's and women's football.”

This means that, from now on, every player representing Brazil will receive equal daily rates and prize money when playing with the national squad, a policy that could set an example for many federations in Latin America.

Up to now, countries such as Australia, Norway, and New Zealand are some of the few nations to have already committed to work towards equal pay in soccer.

Caboclo made it clear that the women's team that wins or progresses through the stages at next year's Olympic Games will receive the same reward as the men.

"What the men will receive at the next World Cup (2022) will be proportionately equal to what is proposed by FIFA. There is no more gender difference; the CBF is treating men and women equally."

On the other hand, the U.S. women's soccer team was not as lucky as their Brazilian counterparts. Last year, after winning the World Cup, a federal judge dismissed their bid for equal pay, rejecting claims that players had been underpaid, marking a crushing defeat in light of the constant struggle for equal rights for women in sports.

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