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  • Beside the twisted and fake representation of her administration, Añez has been target of criticism for replicating socially assigned heteronormative roles.

    Beside the twisted and fake representation of her administration, Añez has been target of criticism for replicating socially assigned heteronormative roles. | Photo: TeleSur

Published 28 February 2020

The self-proclaimed president of Bolivia chose to present her campaign for the upcoming elections with a waterfall of winks to the patriarchy

Bolivian de facto president Jeanine Añez is under public scrutiny these days after releasing her presidential candidacy through a video that not few have considered full of sexist stereotypes.

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In the video, she represented Bolivia as an abandoned house, which she and her people rebuilt. Besides the twisted and fake representation of her administration, Añez has been the target of criticism for replicating socially assigned heteronormative roles.

She is in charge of cleaning a fantasy house in ruins, sorting furniture, and straightening the paintings with the help of a group of women, while men deal with the supposed structural problems.

"We had to put the house in order," recites meanwhile Añez, who will participate in the next elections with an Evo Morales outlawed after the coup of November 2019.

The movement to Socialism candidate, Luis Arce, was the first candidate to oppose the video.  "It devalues women," the economist accused. "It expresses what the candidate is, machismo, her belief that women only serve to put vases and pillows," he completed.

While the de facto president had denied the possibility of a possible candidacy for the presidency, on January 24, she formally announced her nomination by the group Soberanía y Libertad (Sol.bo). Previously, in the annulled elections of October last year, this group was an ally of former president Carlos Mesa, of the Citizen Community (CC).

"While others looked around, we faced the challenge. Together. We raised and adjusted the disorder; we straightened the paintings and collected hundreds of broken glass," Añez says in the video.

Jeanine Añez has been criticized too by her former coup allies, now rivals for May general elections, Carlos Mesa and Fernando Camacho, for abusing her position to benefit her political ambitions.

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