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  • Salvadoran Assembly during their vote on Wednesday.

    Salvadoran Assembly during their vote on Wednesday. | Photo: @AsambleaSV

Published 27 February 2020
Opinion

Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele announced that he will veto the law passed by the Legislative Assembly.

The Legislative Assembly of El Salvador approved on Wednesday a law of reconciliation which is strongly opposed by victims of civil war and human rights organizations.

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The Special Law on Transitional Justice, Reparation and National Reconciliation was passed with 44 votes and in the midst of strong rejections by war victims, who have cataloged this regulation as a "new disguised amnesty."

With just 58 deputies present, of the 84 in Congress, the president of the Legislative Assembly, Mario Ponce, convened an extraordinary plenary session convened by Ponce and whose only point on the agenda was the approval of said law that did not have the Party votes in the Government, the Grand Alliance for National Unity (WINS).

Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele announced that he will veto the law if it does not meet the parameters of the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court of Justice.

The Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court of Justice (CSJ) gave two extensions to the deputies of the Political Commission of the Congress, to create an instrument that would guarantee the necessary information for the clarification of the facts, the reparation of the victims and the provision of the necessary resources to respond to the needs of truth and justice.

Among the questions of the victims and some deputies who did not vote for said law, which did not have the support of the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) party, is the lack of elements that guarantee justice for those affected by the war crimes and against humanity.

As approved by the Legislative Assembly, the law does not include prison sentences for persons responsible and involved in war crimes or crimes against humanity, and leaves the door open for commutation of sentences for reasons of illness and age, without specifying cases in which it will apply.

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