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  • A man shows a house damaged during the new round of Nagorno-Karabakh conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia in Fuzuli district of Azerbaijan, Sept. 30, 2020.

    A man shows a house damaged during the new round of Nagorno-Karabakh conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia in Fuzuli district of Azerbaijan, Sept. 30, 2020. | Photo: Tofik Babayev/Xinhua

Published 2 October 2020
Opinion

Putin reiterated the need to immediately end hostilities and resume political and diplomatic efforts to resolve the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan held a telephone conversation Friday, during which they covered the escalation of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and addressed information on the presence of illegal armed groups in the region, according to the Kremlin.

"Both sides expressed serious concern over the information received about the involvement of illegal armed groups from the Middle East in the hostilities," said the Kremlin in a statement.

Putin reiterated the need to immediately end hostilities and resume political and diplomatic efforts to resolve the conflict in line with the statement made by the presidents of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) Minsk Group Co-Chairs countries on Thursday, the statement read.

RELATED: Nagorno-Karabaj: Russia, U.S. and France Urge Ceasefire

It was agreed to continue contacts in various formats, it said.

On Thursday, Russian President Vladimir Putin, U.S. President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron, representing the OSCE Minsk Group Co-Chairs countries, called for an immediate cessation of hostilities between countries involved in the armed conflict in the Nagorno-Karabakh region in a joint statement.

A new round of clashes broke out on Sunday morning along the contact line of the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

Armenia and Azerbaijan have been at loggerheads over the mountainous region of Nagorno-Karabakh since 1988. Peace talks have been held since 1994 when a ceasefire was reached, but there have been occasional minor clashes along the borders.

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