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  • Madonna talks to her concert crowd in support of impeachment in Philadelphia, U.S.

    Madonna talks to her concert crowd in support of impeachment in Philadelphia, U.S. | Photo: Reuters

Published 13 December 2019

On Friday, the House Judiciary Committee approved the two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Pop icon Madonna talked to a crowd of concert-goers in Philadelphia on Tuesday, and criticized U.S. President Donald Trump for “not supporting the constitution” and called for his impeachment.

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During her concert, the singer spoke to her audience in Philadelphia, a historic city for the various representative events of the American revolution, and ended her monologue with "I say, impeach Donald Trump."
 
Madona started off by saying "So, Philadelphia, very important historical city. So many important things have happened here. Right? The Constitution. The Bill of Rights. Declaration of Independence."

The Pop-Star continued saying, "right now our head of state is not supporting the Constitution, and all the things that we stand for, and believe in, and that America was founded on."

"I'm very grateful that I have the freedom, I'm very proud to be an American...and I have the freedom to speak my mind to express myself, I don't take that for granted. However, I believe that there are people who are trying to take those feelings away," the "queen of pop" and one of the most important artists for her worldwide socio-cultural impact, concluded.

On this Friday, the House Judiciary Committee approved the two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Both articles have received support from the 23 Democrats present in the Committee and the negative vote of the 17 Republicans.

As the charges were approved, they will be sent to the full House of Representatives for a vote next week that could make Trump the third president in U.S. history to face a political trial.

The procedure is curious: the House approves the trial and the Senate must carry it out. However, as the House is in the Democratic majority, it passed, but the Senate is in the Republican majority, and two-thirds of the senators would be necessary to achieve it. So, Trump is unlikely to be convicted in the Senate, but his impeachment may still have an impact on the election campaign as Democrats seek to retake control of the White House.

Democrats have moved rapidly in their impeachment inquiry since launching an investigation on September 24 into allegations that Trump pressured Ukraine to investigate a Democratic political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, in the 2020 elections.

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