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  • Treasure found in Hungary following low water level in the Danube.

    Treasure found in Hungary following low water level in the Danube. | Photo: EFE

Published 25 October 2018

The discovery happened near the town of Erd, south of Budapest. Archeologists are working assiduously to recover as much of the treasure as possible before the water level rises again.

A treasure trove from the 18th century was found in Hungary, due to low water level in the Danube river. Thousands of gold and silver coins were discovered. The find was not only comprised of coins but also various weapons dating back to the 1600's and 1700's.

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Katalin Kovacs, an archaeologist with the Ferenczy Museum Center, told the MTI agency that “around 2,000 coins have been found, as well as arms, pikes, cannon balls and swords.”

The discovery happened near the town of Erd, south of Budapest. Archeologists are working assiduously to recover as much of the treasure as possible before the water level rises again. Groups of divers, drones and other experts have joined the team of scientists.

The treasure was located on a sunken trading boat. “The coins are 90 percent foreign and date from between 1630 and 1743,” archaeologist Balazs Nagy disclosed to Klub radio station, adding that the coins had been minted in “the Netherlands, in France, Zurich and even the Vatican.” The origin of the sunken boat is yet to be revealed. 

Similarly to other rivers across Europe, the Danube is experiencing historically low levels, caused by an extensive period of dry weather. In Budapest, the water level is at a dangerously low 38 centimeters, which has affected shipping traffic.

The treasure was first uncovered by an amateur archeologist, with a metal detector, who found a bell bearing the figure of Saint George. The archeologist informed the museum, leading to other discoveries. Details of the shipwreck are yet to be determined. But, tests to authenticate the date of the coins could shed light on the origin of the vessel.

The Ferenczy Museum Center plans to showcase the findings later in an exhibition.

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