• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • The floodings have killed over 21.000 domestic animals.

    The floodings have killed over 21.000 domestic animals. | Photo: Twitter/ @IFRCAfrica

Published 24 September 2020
Opinion

Early estimates point out that the floods this year have affected almost as many people as the previous ten years combined. 

Floodings in the Afar Regional State have affected more than 144.000 people as one million more were affected nationwide in Ethiopia during the past weeks, authorities reported on Thursday.

RELATED:

Ethiopians Suffer Displacement Crisis Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

The head of Afar's Regional State Disaster Prevention and Food Security Bureau, Mohammed Hussein, explained to local media outlets that in the state alone, 240.000 people had suffered damages as the overflow of the Awash river is causing unprecedented floodings.

"Even if the regional and federal governments, as well as different organizations, have been supporting the displaced persons surrounded by water, the assistance provided is still insufficient," the official warned.

Hussein explained that at the same time, Afar is also struggling with a locust invasion and the COVID-19 pandemic, which has critically affected the access to clean water, medicines, and shelter.

The floodings in Afar have destroyed 105 schools, 200 rural roads, and six bridges. It also killed over 21.000 domestic animals.

Ethiopia's summer season, from June to September, started to trigger floodings from late July at exceptional levels. The dams of Kesem, Tendaho, and Koka on the Awash river remain overflowed, forcing 144.000 people to leave their homes.

Moreover, the authorities said that the states of Ogaden, Afar, Amhara, and Oromia are the hardest-hit by the rainfall. Also, Ogaden reports 200.000 displaced after the Wabi Shebelle; Genale and Dawa rivers overflowed, but authorities are still assessing the damages. Early estimations point out that the floods this year have affected almost as many people as the previous ten years combined.


  

   

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.