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News > Chile

Chile's Constitutional Convention To Run First Plenary Session

  • Citizens supporting the drafting of a new Constitution, Chile.

    Citizens supporting the drafting of a new Constitution, Chile. | Photo: Twitter/ @OxfordFLJS

Published 15 February 2022 (16 hours 43 minutes ago)
Opinion

The Constitution drafting process stems from the political agreements reached after the 2019 massive anti-government protests.

On Tuesday, the Chilean Constituent Convention begins its first plenary session, in which seven thematic committees will present articles to be included in the new Magna Carta for the rest of the assembly members to discuss and vote on them.

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The session will start with the presentation of the Justice Systems Commission, which has written 16 articles on the bases and principles of the judicial system. To be approved by the plenary, the articles will require the support of at least two-thirds of the assembly members.

Once all committees submit their proposals, the Plenary will have until July to present a final version of the constitutional text, which citizens must ratify afterward through a referendum.

The Constitution drafting process stems from the political agreements reached after the 2019 massive anti-government protests, in which Chileans demanded to put an end to the marked social inequalities inherited from Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973-1990).

Formed in July 2021, the Convention comprises Indigenous and LGBTQ representatives, and its process is currently supported by over 50 percent of the citizenry, according to polling conducted by Cadem enterprise.

"The work has exceeded our expectations. We are sure it will guarantee political power for the People," Constitutional Convention Vice President Jaime Bassa said, adding the drafting of the new constitution will occur amid the favorable environment created by a government led by Gabriel Boric.

"The constitutional process is a long-term state issue. We all have to do our best for it since the Convention’s success means wellbeing and peace for the Chilean people,” said the President-elect Boric, who will take oath on March 11.

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