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  • U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks next to House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff  on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 15, 2019

    U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks next to House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 15, 2019 | Photo: Reuters

Published 15 October 2019

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani denied cooperating with a House impeachment inquiry, prompting Democrats to say that would strengthens their case.

United States Vice President Mike Pence and Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani say they won't testify in front of the House of Representatives impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump. Other government officials have not been as reluctant to cooperate.

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The Pentagon said it would not submit to lawmakers’ request for documents related to Trump’s effort to pressure Ukraine to investigate his presidential rival, Joe Biden, further illustrating his determination to stonewall the Democratic-led impeachment effort, which is now consuming his presidency.

“The evidence of obstruction of Congress continues to build,” said Democratic Representative Adam Schiff, one of the leaders of the impeachment, said at a news conference.

Democrats are focused on Trump’s request to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in a July 25th phone call to look into unsubstantiated allegations about Joe Biden, the former vice president and a Democratic nominee front-runner in the November 2020 presidential elections.

Figures from that party have also been outspoken about the case like senior diplomat, George Kent, who declared in closed-door testimony that he had been alarmed by efforts by Giuliani and others to pressure Ukraine.

“He was pretty detailed in talking about some of the shady characters Giuliani was dependent on for misinformation,” added Democrat Gerry Connolly to reporters on Tuesday.

If the Democratic-controlled House votes to approve formal charges of impeachment, the Republican-controlled Senate would then hold a trial on whether to remove the president from office. Success is seen as unlikely at this point as few Republican senators have criticized Trump.

A Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Tuesday showed that 43 percent of U.S. adults believe Trump should be impeached, while 42 say no. Another 14 percent say they are unsure.

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