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  • Hundreds of National Guard troops nap inside the US Capitol Visitor Center as the House prepares to debate on an article of impeachment against President Trump. Washington, DC, USA. January 13, 2021.⁠

    Hundreds of National Guard troops nap inside the US Capitol Visitor Center as the House prepares to debate on an article of impeachment against President Trump. Washington, DC, USA. January 13, 2021.⁠ | Photo: Twitter/@NBCNews

Published 13 January 2021
Opinion

The U.S. president faces a single charge of "inciting insurrection."

U.S. President Donald Trump has been indicted for a second time during his presidential term, which is scheduled to end in seven days, in an unprecedented vote in the House of Representatives, just one week after his supporters stormed the Capitol.

Before starting the assault, the Republican leader encouraged his followers to "fight like hell" against the results of last November's elections at an event held on Wednesday, January 6, outside of the White House.

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Democratic Lawmakers Call for Trump Impeachment

Nine Republicans joined the Democrats in indicting Trump a second time, just seven days before he leaves office, and President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in on January 20.

A majority vote by the House majority now triggers a trial in the still Republican-controlled Senate, although it remains unclear whether such a trial would take place in time to oust Trump from the White House.

The Democrats moved forward with an impeachment vote after Vice President Mike Pence rejected an effort to persuade him to invoke the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to remove Trump.

"I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our Nation or consistent with our Constitution," Pence said in a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

The collapse of Trump's last days in office, against alarming warnings of more violence from his supporters, leaves this nation at an uncomfortable and unknown juncture before Democrat Joe Biden takes office on January 20.

"If inviting a mob to insurrection against its own government is not an actionable event, then what is?" said Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Maryland, editor of the indictment.

Trump, who becomes the only U.S. president to be indicted twice, faces an only sole charge of "inciting insurrection."

The four-page impeachment resolution builds on Trump's own rhetoric and the falsehoods he spread about Biden's election victory, including at a White House rally on the day of the Capitol's attack, build the case for serious crimes as required by the Constitution.

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