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    Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May arrives for a family photo during the European Union leaders informal summit in Salzburg, Austria, Sept. 20, 2018. | Photo: Reuters

Published 23 September 2018

Jeremy Corbyn, the leftist British leader said he would call for a no-confidence vote if May’s bill for Brexit fails to pass in the country’s parliament later next month, in order to trigger new elections.

Theresa May may call for snap elections in November, several senior advisers to the British prime minister said Sunday, as talks over the U.K.’s exit from the European Union reach a “humiliating” point following reports that most EU leaders think that her plan for Brexit “will not work”.

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The report from The Sunday Times said the newspaper spoke to two of May's senior aides, who said “they were planning to announce a new general election to secure public backing for a new negotiating platform with the EU,” according to the media outlet.

The news comes hours after the Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn said he would back a new Brexit referendum if his party voted in favor of one during his party's party national conference this week. This comes as Corbyn and his party push for triggering a general election as May fails to deliver on her promises.  

The leftist British leader said he would call for a no-confidence vote if May’s bill for Brexit fails to pass in the country’s parliament later next month, in order to trigger new elections.

"Our preference would be for a general election and we can then negotiate our future relationship with Europe, but let's see what comes out of conference," he told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, saying Labour was ready to vote against any deal. "Obviously I’m bound by the democracy of our party."

May’s previous attempt at securing public support for her Brexit plan backfired when her right-wing party lost their majority in surprise snap elections she had called for in 2017, in which Labour gained electoral territory against predictions of pre-election polls that favored May’s party.


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