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  • The embassy was raided just before the Feb. 27-28 summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump.

    The embassy was raided just before the Feb. 27-28 summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump. | Photo: Reuters

Published 28 March 2019

A U.S. government source confirmed Wednesday that the FBI was notified of the names of the alleged embassy intruders and was reviewing the details.

An international arrest warrant has been issued by Spanish authorities for two alleged intruders from a group who broke into the North Korean embassy in Madrid last month.

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Following an investigation into the incident, a document from Spanish Judge Jose de la Mata revealed that the intruders attempted to coerce North Korean envoy So Yun-sok to deflect before stealing equipment including computers, hard drives and documents.

The intruders allegedly also released footage of a pixelated figure pulling portraits of leaders Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il off the wall and breaking them during the February 22 incident.

A U.S. government source confirmed Wednesday that the FBI was notified of the names of the alleged embassy intruders and was reviewing the details of the request.

The case was undisclosed prior to a secrecy order being lifted Tuesday.

The two men, who are being sought by Madrid, have been identified as suspected ring leader Adrian Hong Chang and accomplice Sam Ryu.

According to the court’s official document, which was made public Tuesday, Hong Chang is believed to have traveled to the United States one day after the raid and contacted the Federal Bureau of Investigation to pass on information. According to a judiciary source, the state believes that both accused are currently in the United States.

The court stated that "our standard practice to neither confirm nor deny the existence of an investigation," while declining to reveal how the specifics of the men’s operation and whereabouts were obtained.

The court document also detailed the intruders’ movements before and during the intrusion, including their hotel stay and purchases of knives, balaclava masks and fake guns.

The group reportedly tied up the embassy’s staff and searched the premises before dispersing in four groups and heading to Portugal, the document alleged.

Deflector organization Cheollima Civil Defence's website seemingly accepted responsibility saying "no-one was gagged or beaten" and adding that the group was requested at the premises.

The group said that "no other governments involved with or aware of our activity until after the event."

Meanwhile, the U.S. State Department spokesman Robert Palladino has said the government was not involved in the raid.

The group of intruders, which reportedly includes South Koreans, is estimated to have up to 10 members and will effect subsequent warrants.

Spain's Interior Ministry had previously said police were investigating an incident at the embassy but gave little to no details, Reuters reported.

The embassy was raided just before the Feb. 27-28 summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump.

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