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  • The Airlite paint oxygenates the surrounding air through a chemical reaction.

    The Airlite paint oxygenates the surrounding air through a chemical reaction. | Photo: @Notimex

Published 22 March 2019

Three enormous murals painted on buildings using Airlite, an innovative paint used to decontaminate air in a makeshift photosynthesis process, have decorated structures with environment-themed images.

French alcoholic beverage company, Pernod Ricard, has launched an environmentally-beneficial mural project in Mexico City, involving three gigantic works of art being painted on buildings using Airlite.

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Airlite, an innovative paint used to decontaminate air through photosynthesis, decorates several buildings with the environment-themed images. When the paint is exposed to sunlight, the surrounding air is oxygenated through a chemical reaction.

One paint job can maintain this chemical reaction for up to 10 years.

The "Absolut Street Trees" murals can be found on buildings in the neighborhoods of Cuauhtemoc, Juarez and Roma. Brand manager for Pernod Ricard in Mexico, Ana Carolina Herrera, says the aim of the project is to use the appeal of urban street art to raise environmental awareness among young people.


"'Street Trees': Our new work for ABSOLUT. A year-long effort that today, finally becomes reality. Thanks to our customers at Pernod Ricard for believing in ideas like this and above all, for their commitment to create a better tomorrow."
 

Herrera describes the city's contamination as one of its major problems. She says that “b mixing technology and art, this way of planting ‘trees’ was created... esides putting a vibrant and colorful stamp on Mexico City, they [the murals] contribute to oxygenating the air.”

The message written on one of the buildings located on the Paseo de la Reforma boulevard, by the Spanish collective Boa Mistura, reads "Soy porque somos" which translates to "I am because we are." The message wishes to convey that each individual is a part of the greater scheme of things, "like single leaves on the same tree."

Although messages of environmental awareness are the main focus of each mural, Mexican artist Revost included themes of gender equality in his mural named "El arbol de las serpientes" or "Tree of Serpents."

The third mural is currently in the works and is being painted by internationally acclaimed Mexican artist, Seher One, who says the piece falls in line with his normal line of work, which typically aims to "stimulate curiosity" about current issues and "transform" the thought process of his audience.

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