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  • The Huawei headquarters in Duesseldorf, Germany, Feb. 18, 2019.

    The Huawei headquarters in Duesseldorf, Germany, Feb. 18, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 8 March 2019

China's Foreign Ministry supports the company's search for legal action.

Chinese telecom equipment maker Huawei said Thursday it has filed a lawsuit against the United States government over a ban on its products in the U.S. market.

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"This ban is not only illegal but also restricts Huawei to fair competition and ultimately harms U.S. consumers," Guo Ping, Huawei Rotating Chairman, said and denounced his company’s servers have been hacked, in addition to the "stealing" of the emails from the US authorities.

Huawei's lawsuit, which was filed in the Eastern District Court of Texas, challenges the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which U.S. President Donald Trump signed in August 2018, banning federal agencies and their contractors from acquiring Huawei equipment and services.

"The U.S. Congress has repeatedly failed to produce any evidence to support its restrictions on Huawei products. We are compelled to take this legal action as a proper and last resort," Guo said and addd that “we look forward to the court's verdict."

Huawei chairman insisted that the Trump administation’s decision is "unconstitutional" and interferes in the market.

"If this law were to be annulled, as it should be, Huawei could provide more technological advances to the U.S. and help build the best 5G networks," he said.

On this issue, China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi said the U.S. actions against Huawei are a deliberate political move to "bring down" the high-tech Chinese company.

"We support [Huawei] in seeking legal redress in order to protect its interests," Wang said, stressing that the Chinese government does defend not only a company's interest but also its Nation's legitimate right to development and, by extension, the basic right of all the countries to climb the technological ladder."

Huawei's decision comes after receiving 13 counts in the U.S., including industrial espionage and bank fraud, and appears blacklisted in several countries for allegedly lacking security of its network equipment.

Huawei chairman insisted that the Trump administration's decision is "unconstitutional" and interferes with the market.

"If this law were to be annulled, as it should be, Huawei could provide more technological advances to the U.S. and help build the best 5G networks," he said.

The Chinese company's decision comes after receiving, the U.S. Department of Justice, 13 counts of fraud, industrial espionage and intellectual property theft. 

In addition, the U.S. Department of State keeps a campaign against Huawei, which is the world's second largest smartphone manufacturer, pressuring countries and Internet providers to avoid the Chinese company, arguing Beijing could force it to spy on or deactivate their networks.

Huawei's 5G technology security allegations have been rejected by the company, which insists it does not have "back doors" to access any device and control it without the user's knowledge.


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