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  • President Moise said the decision would be the result of discussions with various public institutions.

    President Moise said the decision would be the result of discussions with various public institutions. | Photo: md.gouv.ht

Published 17 July 2018

President Moise plans to "form an inclusive government" which would "alleviate the misery of the Haitian people" following the resignation of Jack Guy Lafontant.

Haitians are on standby as President Jovenel Moise and the two heads of parliament meet to appoint the country's new prime minister following the resignation of Jack Guy Lafontant last week.

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Haiti's President Moise Calls for Peace After PM Resigns

During a press conference on July 16, Moise said a decision would be made quickly and would be the result of discussions with various institutions to ensure the needs of the public are met.

"I will continue with the consultations with all the institutions, the parliament, the political parties, and all the organized sectors of the country to choose a prime minister to administer the government and bring together all the living forces of the nation, without losing time to form an inclusive government," Moise said.

Moise met with the head of the Senate and the head of the Chamber of Deputies, Joseph Lambert and Gary Bodeau, to discuss the possible candidates.

He also met with a commission of religious leaders, members of the National Confederation of Haitian Voodooists (CNVH) in the National Palace in an effort to establish a national dialogue composed equally of the economic, political, social and religious sectors.

Yvon Bonhomme, a representative from Patriots Reunited to Save the House (Parasol), requested that the president maintain a transparent process in the formation of the new cabinet and consider the needs of citizens with either disabilities or limited mobility during this critical time.

During a television broadcast July 15, President Moise said he planned to "form an inclusive government" which would "alleviate the misery of the Haitian people."

Earlier this month, as part of an agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Haitian government announced a reduction in fuel subsidies that would have caused a 38 percent rise in gasoline prices and 47 percent hike for diesel.

The move triggered widespread protests during which demonstrators barricaded roads, looted stores, and set cars ablaze in the capital, Port-au-Prince. At least seven were killed in the violent demonstrations.

The former prime minister announced his resignation July 14 as he was facing a vote of no confidence in an interpellation session in the Chamber of Deputies.

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