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  • Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido leaves after a meeting with workers of Venezuela's state oil company PDVSA in Caracas

    Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido leaves after a meeting with workers of Venezuela's state oil company PDVSA in Caracas | Photo: Reuters

Published 6 May 2019 (22 hours 48 minutes ago)

The self-proclaimed "interim president" of Venezuela admitted to the Washington Post that he expected the legitimate President Nicolás Maduro to step down after he announced his coup on April 30. 

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido told the Washington Post last Saturday that his coup was meant to stir a military uprising to overthrow the government of legitimate President Nicolás Maduro.

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Guaido admitted to the Washington Post that he made many errors during the coup attempt, including his failure to win over the armed forces of the Bolivarian Republic. 

During the exclusive interview,  Guaido said he expected the Venezuelan military, along with members of the government, to defect to his side.

“Maybe because we still need more soldiers, and maybe we need more officials of the regime to be willing to support it, to back the constitution,” Guaidó said. “I think the variables are obvious at this point.”

The self-proclaimed "interim president" of Venezuela admitted to the Washington Post that he expected the President Maduro to step down after he announced his coup via Twitter on April 30. 

Guaido, who presents himself as a "popular leader", said he has not ruled out U.S. military intervention in Venezuela, regardless if he doesn't have the support of the people. 

The Trump administration has also solidly backed Guaido, often declaring "all options are on the table" when it comes to military intervention in the Bolivarian Republic.

When he was asked if U.S. national security adviser John Bolton offered military intervention, Guaido shamelessly replied: “Dear friend, ambassador John Bolton, thank you for all the help you have given to the just cause here. Thank you for the option, we will evaluate it, and will probably consider it in parliament to solve this crisis. If it’s necessary, maybe we will approve it.”

Bolton has repeatedly threatened military action in several countries, including Venezuela and Iran. The U.S. national security adviser is considered one of the biggest war hawks in Washington. 

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