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    Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro attends a ceremony at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil April 8, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 8 April 2019

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said Monday he is working with the U.S. government to sow dissent within the Venezuelan Army.
 

Bolsonaro said on Monday he was working with the U.S. in order to destabilize the Venezuelan Army.

During an interview with Jovem Pan radio, Bolsonaro said that if there is a military invasion in Venezuela, he would seek the counsel of Brazil's National Defense Council and Congress on what action his country should take.

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"We cannot allow Venezuela to become a new Cuba or North Korea," the right-wing president said.

Bolsonaro added that if any military intervention actually deposed Venezuela's president, Nicolas Maduro, it is quite likely that the country would see guerrilla warfare waged by Maduro's diehard backers and whoever took power.

But late on March, Brazilian Defense Minister Fernando Azevedo said that military intervention was "not a hypothesis we're considering." He added during a meeting with his American counterpart at the Pentagon that Brazil was looking forward to a peaceful and swift solution to the crisis in Venezuela.

Bolsonaro on Monday fired the education minister from his position because of a range of controversial proposals including a revision of school textbooks to deny the 1964 military coup.

A survey published Sunday by Datafolha revealed that 30 percent of Brazilians believe his government is “bad or terrible,” 32 percent rank it “good or excellent”, and 33 percent say it is “average,” which comes as he will mark his 100th day in office on Wednesday.

This evaluation is the worst for a president since Fernando Collor in 1990 had a disapproval rating of 19 percent after three months. In contrast, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and Dilma Rousseff (PT) respectively had a 10 percent in 2003 and seven percent rating in 2011.


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