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  • Sudanese demonstrators run from teargas lobbed to disperse them as they march along the street during anti-government protests in Khartoum, Sudan December 25, 2018

    Sudanese demonstrators run from teargas lobbed to disperse them as they march along the street during anti-government protests in Khartoum, Sudan December 25, 2018 | Photo: Reuters

Published 26 December 2018

Police in Khartoum repressed Sudanese protesters trying to reach the presidential palace using live ammunition and tear gas.

On Tuesday, three Sudanese protesters were wounded by gunshots used by security forces in an attempt to disperse demonstrations against President Omar al-Bashir’s regime.

RELATED: 
Sudan: Police Shot 37 Protesters Dead in 5 Days

Police in Khartoum repressed Sudanese protesters trying to reach the presidential palace using live ammunition and tear gas.

“Peaceful, peaceful against the thieves,” and “The people want to bring down the regime,” chanted the demonstrators, Al Jazeera reported.

“Even with the tear gas being fired at them, some people have been using headscarves and went on to proceed against the riot police with their demands that the president must leave.”

The government has a different version of how law enforcement is operating alleging protesters have been dealt with in a “civilized manner,” according to Reuters.

At least 37 Sudanese were shot dead over five days of protests in the country against hikes in prices and downward spiraling economic conditions.

A human rights watchdog indicated the events happening on Tuesday would likely escalate the violence already taking place.

“With further protest planned tomorrow, the fact that the security forces are using lethal force so indiscriminately against unarmed protesters is extremely troubling,” said Sarah Jackson, Amnesty International's deputy director for East Africa, the Great Lakes, and the Horn.

The events took place in the context of a march called by workers' associations planned to go from Aby Janzir Square in central Khartoum to the presidential palace to demand that President Omar al-Bashir immediately step down after 29 years in office and for the formation of a transitional government.

“The trigger of the protests was the rise in the bread prices, but underlying these protests is a long-standing public discontent over the economic and political policies of Bashir’s regime,” Sudanese analyst Mohamed Osman stated.


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