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  • 26 people died and 77 injured in Haiti since the start of anti-government protests on Feb. 7.

    26 people died and 77 injured in Haiti since the start of anti-government protests on Feb. 7. | Photo: Reuters

Published 26 February 2019

IACHR report revealed that from Feb. 7 till now, 26 people have died in Haiti and 77 were injured during protests that started on Feb. 7.

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) published a report Monday which revealed that at least 26 people have died and 77 others were injured since the protest started on Feb. 7.

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IACHR expressed its concern about the continuing violence in the country and said the organization has "collected disturbing information about blockades of streets, avenues, and roads; violence directed at protesters; sporadic shooting and arrests of people during the protests."

In one tweet IAHCR wrote, "The @IACHR has been monitoring the violent events that began on February 7 in #Haiti, in the context of the protests. The @IACHR reiterates its concern about this situation that today records at least 26 people dead and 77 injured.”

The organization also highlighted its concern over the situation which has the potential to threaten basic services like food, water, and health.

The street demonstrations began on Feb.7, with many demanding the resignation of President Jovenel Moise as well as urgent calls to address the socioeconomic crisis that haunts the Caribbean island.

In Haiti, where about eight million people survive on less than US$2 a day, the economy grew just 1.4 percent in 2018. In an attempt to bring down the budget deficit, President Moise reduced public spending, an option which was not well received by citizens, opposition politicians, and social leaders.

According to economist Camille Chalmers, the executive provisions are a mockery because they continue the policy of austerity measures which were already decreed in 2017.

Since then, the government has not complied with its own provisions because the privileges for the ruling class increased to the point that a senator costs the Haitian state much more than what it costs in other Caribbean countries.

The president of Haiti broke his silence and made a new call to dialogue after eight days of violent protests on Feb. 14 which was rejected by protesting factions. 

The Crisis in Haiti were on the top agenda of the Caribbean Community’s (CARICOM) two-day summit Tuesday in Basseterre, on the dual-island nation of St. Kitts and Nevis, which was also to discuss the situation in Venezuela.


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