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  • Chef Erika Jones (R) gives food to a passerby from the refrigerator installed outside of the Roots Collective, a network of black-owned businesses, in Miami, Florida, U.S. August  25, 2020.

    Chef Erika Jones (R) gives food to a passerby from the refrigerator installed outside of the Roots Collective, a network of black-owned businesses, in Miami, Florida, U.S. August 25, 2020. | Photo: EFE

Published 8 September 2020
Opinion

The racial gap in pandemic harm has been revealed not only in the population but also among healthcare workers. Several studies concluded that doctors, nurses, and physicians from ethnic minorities were more exposed to the virus and had the worst Personal Protection Equipment.

U.S. COVID-19 deaths among Black and Latino communities alarmingly increased in August, according to a recent study conducted by American Public Media (APM) Research Lab.

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“We are seeing more deaths among African Americans and Latinos than at any time this summer. So as we go into the fall, with schools and colleges reopening and other new avenues for exposure, it portends a very frightening future,” APM senior researcher Andi Egbert, said.

According to the statistics, the death rate among the Black community increased in eight more deaths in 100,000 people, as it went from 80 to 88 per 100,000. Latino faced a similar increase rate after COVID-19 deaths in the community raised from 46 to 54 in 100,000. 

The figures double the escalation of the white death toll, from 36 to 40 per 100,000, which translates into four new deaths in 100,000. The spike pandemic-related casualties occurred from August 4 to 18, concurring with outbreaks in southern states, which are predominately Black and Latino populated. 

According to APM, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina recorded the highest death toll among black people, while Arizona, Florida, Louisiana, and Tennessee registered more Latino deaths.

The racial gap in pandemic harm has been revealed not only in the population but also among healthcare workers. Several studies concluded that doctors, nurses, and physicians from ethnic minorities were more exposed to the virus and had the worst Personal Protection Equipment.

“It’s incredibly discouraging to know that we are aware of where the greatest vulnerabilities are, and yet we’ve been ineffectual in our responses,” Egbert added.

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