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  • Members of the staff attend to motorist at a Covid-19 testing centre in Central London, Britain,  September 12 2020.

    Members of the staff attend to motorist at a Covid-19 testing centre in Central London, Britain, September 12 2020. | Photo: EFE

Published 14 September 2020
Opinion

Epidemiologists and doctors have been repurposing preexisting medications to tackle the virus, but REGN-COV2 offers a new possibility of being the first drug designed based on COVID-19 characteristics, according to the research team.

The U.K. Recovery trial, an Oxford-based study, would include a new promising experimental drug in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. 

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The National Hospitals System (NHS) would randomly supply sufferers with  REGN-COV2, a combination of two human antibodies. The company has previous experience with a similar drug against Ebola.

“We have already discovered that one treatment, dexamethasone, benefits Covid-19 patients, but the death rate remains too high, so we must keep searching for others,” said Oxford professor and trial leader, Peter Horby.

Unlike other drugs in COVID-19 treatment protocols, the Recovery trial exclusively created REGN-COV2 to combat the virus. The drug was tested in animals with promising results and is ready for the human clinical trial phase. 

“We are looking forward to seeing whether REGN-COV2 is safe and effective in the context of a large-scale randomized clinical trial; this is the only way to be certain about whether it works as a treatment for Covid-19,” Horby added.

Epidemiologists and doctors have been repurposing preexisting medications to tackle the virus, but REGN-COV2 offers a new possibility of being the first drug designed based on COVID-19 characteristics, according to the researching team.

Recently, statistics showed that new cases in the U.K. doubled every 7.7 days since mid-August, an alarming contagion rhythm. As of Monday, The United Kingdom registered 371,125 COVID-19 cases and 41,637 deaths.

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