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  • People sit in an outdoor seating area in London, England, United Kingdom. September 11, 2020.

    People sit in an outdoor seating area in London, England, United Kingdom. September 11, 2020. | Photo: EFE

Published 11 September 2020
Opinion

After mapping the virus' behavior, the researchers said that about two-thirds of subjects who tested positive were asymptomatic. The infections increase affects all age groups, mainly youngsters from 18-24 and 12 years old children. 

A population surveillance study developed by the Imperial College London in England found that COVID-19 cases are doubling every seven days, according to the latest statistics.

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 “The prevalence of the virus in the population is increasing. We found evidence that it has been accelerating at the end of August and beginning of September,” professor of infectious disease dynamics and research co-writer Steven Riley said.

The study analyzed PCR samples from about 120,000 to 160,000 random subjects in England in 315 areas since May. The researchers concluded that from May to early July, the disease prevalence dropped even during a restriction ease period.

Despite the optimistic findings, after assessing a four-round of data, the investigators concluded that from August to early September, COVID-19 prevalence spiked with new cases doubling in 7.7 days. At the beginning of the pandemic, it was doubling every three days.

“There is a difference in the starting level, and there is a difference in the speed. But I think the overall trend of moving into growth does seem to be affecting a really large proportion of England,” Riley added.

After mapping the virus’ behavior, the researchers said that about two-thirds of subjects who tested positive were asymptomatic. The infections increase affects all age groups, mainly youngsters from 18-24 and 12 years old children. 

As of Friday, the United Kingdom registered 361,677 COVID-19 cases and 41,614 deaths.

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