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  • An 18-year-old mother gorilla holds her newborn baby in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park, in southwestern Uganda. September 1, 2020.

    An 18-year-old mother gorilla holds her newborn baby in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park, in southwestern Uganda. September 1, 2020. | Photo: EFE

Published 2 September 2020
Opinion

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park houses over 400 specimens grouped in about 20 herds. The Rushegura family grew up to 18 members after the last birth this weekend.

Uganda's population of gorillas increased notably so far this year, said the Wildlife Authority of that nation on Wednesday.

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Five babies have been born in the last six weeks, and all of the newborns belong to the Rushegura clan, a gorilla family settled in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, near to Uganda's border with the Democratic Republic of Congo.

"This is highly unusual; it's an incredible blessing. As conservationists, we're chest-thumping, we are excited," UWA spokesperson Bashir Hangi said.

The six newborns represent an unusual demographic increase, aside from the three births recorded in 2019.

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park houses over 400 specimens grouped in about 20 herds. The Rushegura family grew up to 18 members after the last birth this weekend.

UWA considers the baby boom is related to poaching prevention and other actions of wildlife conservationists. 

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park houses mountain gorillas, elephants, lions, giraffes, rhinos, and other protected species. 

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