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  • Tourists in Teotihuacan, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico. September 10, 2020.

    Tourists in Teotihuacan, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico. September 10, 2020. | Photo: @rob_3103

Published 10 September 2020
Opinion

The archaeological location is 50 kilometers from Mexico City and is considered the most advanced pre-Hispanic city. UNESCO designated Teotihuacan as a world heritage in 1987.

Mexico has reopened the temples and pyramids of Teotihuacan, one of its most visited tourist sites, after a five-month closure due to the pandemic.

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The reopening is welcomed not only as an opportunity for travelers to visit an ancient monument of Mexico's culture, but also an economic resume for locals who resort to the site to sell souvenirs and crafts.

The location would receive only 3,000 tourists per day and would allow visitors only to the main archaeological site and the Avenue of the Dead. Masks and temperature checks are mandatory for tourists' entrance. 

Teotihuacan received an average of 9,000 visitors daily before the pandemic. Despite the economic loss because of allowance reduction, experts consider that it could prevent deterioration. 

Mexico closed the site in March after the firsts COVID-19 cases and in the evening of the spring equinox, one of the main attractions.

The archaeological location is 50 kilometers from Mexico City and is considered the most advanced pre-Hispanic city. UNESCO designated Teotihuacan as a world heritage in 1987.

As of Thursday, Mexico health authorities registered 647,507 COVID-19 cases, 69,095 deaths, and 454,982 recoveries from the virus.

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