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  • People struggles with Hanna-derived flooding in Coahuila, Mexico, July 26, 2020.

    People struggles with Hanna-derived flooding in Coahuila, Mexico, July 26, 2020. | Photo: EFE

Published 27 July 2020
Opinion

It made landfall in Texas this Saturday as a Category 1 hurricane but as of Monday Hanna reduced its intensity to a tropical depression.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) Monday reported that tropical depression Hanna advances through northwest Mexico, after hitting the south Texas coast as a hurricane with heavy rain and winds.

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Hanna came ashore in Texas this Saturday as a Category 1 hurricane on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale, becoming the first hurricane of the Atlantic season.

However, it has now reduced its intensity to a tropical depression with 56 kilometers maximum sustained winds.

It is expected that the storm causes flooding in the Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas. Also, it has been reported several power outages due to winds.

NHC said Hanna could dump upward of 45 cm of rain in the area through Monday, which “will produce life-threatening flash flooding, rapid rises on small streams, and isolated minor to moderate river flooding.”

Hanna is the eighth storm of the current hurricane season, after Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, and Gonzalo. The storm season begins on June 1 and is expected to last until November 30.

For a storm to be named, its winds must exceed 40 miles per hour. In this line, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have predicted that the current hurricane season could have 13 to 19 of these storms.

From six to ten tropical storms could become hurricanes if their winds exceed 119 kilometers per hour.

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