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  • People hold pictures of missing persons during a protest in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    People hold pictures of missing persons during a protest in Buenos Aires, Argentina. | Photo: Twitter/ @starrcongress

Published 30 August 2020
Opinion

Figures from human rights organizations in Mexico show that at least 70,000 people have disappeared in that country.

The International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearance is commemorated every August 30. This date was established by the United Nations (UN) on December 21, 2010, to strengthen the work of international human rights organizations and the Red Cross to clarify the facts.

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UN Report: Enforced Disappearances Widespread in Mexico

Since then, the UN has reiterated its commitment to counter these actions against humanity. "Enforced disappearances are often used as a strategy to instill terror in citizens," the organization stated.

In Latin America, there have been five cases of forced disappearance in recent decades.

Figures from human rights organizations in Mexico show that at least 70,000 people have disappeared in that country.

According to Mexico's National Registry of Disappeared and Unlocated Persons (Rnpdno), as of early August 2020, there were 73,308 missing and unlocated persons in the country. 

That figure is far higher than the number of persons counted by the National Registry of Missing and Disappeared Persons (RNPED) up to April 2018, which was 42,998 persons under that condition

Meanwhile, the dictatorship called the Process of National Reorganization, which governed Argentina from March 24, 1976, until December 10, 1983, left at least 30,000 people forcibly disappeared.

In Colombia, at least 80,514 people have been victims of forced disappearance between 1958 and 2018.

Guatemala's Commission for Historical Clarification stated that the nation's time of conflict left 45,000 people missing and over 1 million displaced.

Human rights groups stated, "Guatemala lost at least 40,000 nationals in the 34-year internal war, but the state did not create a mechanism to search for them.

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