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  • Kayapo indigenous people block Brazil's BR 163 national highway to avoid the COVID-19 spread in Novo Progresso, Brazil, August 20, 2020.

    Kayapo indigenous people block Brazil's BR 163 national highway to avoid the COVID-19 spread in Novo Progresso, Brazil, August 20, 2020. | Photo: Twitter/ @thandojo

Published 22 August 2020
Opinion

Brazil's problems of mismanagement in indigenous communities are because of hatred, institutional racism, and the advance of agribusiness.

Brazil's Supreme Federal Court (STF) Judge Luis Roberto Barroso Friday ordered President Jair Bolsonaro's administration to present a new version of the plan to halt the COVID-19 in the Indigenous communities.

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The original plan was requested last July, following a request from the Articulation of the Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB) and several political parties.

The new order requires the document to be reworked and submitted by September 7.

The TSF decision responds to the demands of organizations and foundations representing the native communities, who point out the lack of precision in the previous government plan. 

Among the organizations that demanded the rewriting of the plan are the National Council of Human Rights (CNDH), the Indigenous Health Working Group of the Brazilian Association of Public Health (Abrasco), the Public Ministry, and the Ombudsman's Office.

"We condemn the Brazilian president's policy to combat the disease among the Indigenous Communities. In our town there are over 700 COVID-19 deaths registered so far," APIB denounced.

Brazil has 26,956 infections and 155 villages affected by the pandemic in native populations. 

"In Mato Grosso do Sul, the Terena ethnic group represents 93 percent of the COVID-19 deaths among Brazil's Indigenous people. The state already has 44 Indigenous deaths in the villages, 41 of which belong to the Terena people," APIB stated. 

Brazil's problems of mismanagement in indigenous communities are because of "hatred, institutional racism, and the advance of agribusiness," the institution assured.

In recent days, members of the Kayapos ethnic group held protests and roadblocks over scarce health resources and against the invasion of their lands by illegal mining.

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