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  • Syria was the U.S. target after two costly direct military invasions in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Syria was the U.S. target after two costly direct military invasions in Afghanistan and Iraq. | Photo: RT

Published 11 November 2019

According to al-Assad, Washington sees that its former dominant role is fading and is trying to preserve it using all available means.

Syria became a testing ground for the United States as it prepares its tools to safeguard world hegemony, Syrian President Bashar Assad told RT’s Afshin Rattansi in an exclusive interview Monday.

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According to the head of state, Washington sees that its former dominant role is fading and is trying to preserve it using all available means, they would "fight the Russians, the Iranians, the Syrians, whoever said 'No to them', even their allies," he said.

Syria was the U.S. target after two costly direct military invasions in Afghanistan and Iraq. In the latter case, the North American nation and its allies fought Saddam Hussein, an Iraq's leader who had the active support of Washington and London for decades, especially in his war with another U.S. rival, Iran.

Later, however, relations between them soured in the wake of the Gulf War and Saddam's Iraq was finally targeted for U.S. invasion in 2003.

Campaigns against Saddam and the Taliban in Afghanistan proved too costly for Washington and apparently produced lower-than-expected returns. Therefore, the U.S. adopted a different approach in an attempt to overthrow its government, Assad said, a war through proxies.

"The Americans always try to loot other countries in different ways regarding not only their oil or money, or financial resources. They loot their rights, their political rights, every other right. That's their historical role at least after World War II," the Syrian president said.

Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs Spokesperson Maria Zajarova stressed that the U.S. smuggles more than US$30 million worth of oil from Syria each month and does not intend to leave the region in the foreseeable future.

On the issue regarding the Islamic State group, Assad said the dark ties between Washington and hard-line militants in Syria are the reason he is skeptical about President Donald Trump's claim that U.S. special operations actually toppled IS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

As in the case of Osama Bin Laden, no definitive proof of death was made public, which contrasts sharply with what happened to people like Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein or Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

Moscow, for its part, also has reservations about claims that Baghdadi is dead, and has called for the release of some definitive evidence.

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