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  • A boy takes a picture of a house laid to rubble by Saudi aerial shelling.

    A boy takes a picture of a house laid to rubble by Saudi aerial shelling. | Photo: Reuters

Published 24 December 2017

Locals said the children were playing in the al-Sukhnah district when the incident occurred.

At least four children have been killed by an unexploded bomb that went off in Yemen's Hudaydah province on Saturday. Five others were critically injured by the device that was dropped by Saudi warplanes.

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Yemen Marks 1,000 Days of Saudi-Led War

Locals said the children were playing in the al-Sukhnah district, when the incident occurred, according to al-Masirah. Three other civilians were killed across Hudaydah province as a direct result of Saudi aerial attacks.

In separate Saudi airstrikes in the capital of Sana'a: five more children were killed in residential buildings in the Arhab district; two women were found dead in the Razih district, and two children and a woman lost their lives in the Sanhan district

Additionally, two more people were killed and several others injured when Saudi military aircraft bombarded an area nearby Arhab University.

Accompanied by a constraining land, aerial and naval blockade, the Saudi-led war against Yemen, which started in 2015, has been energized by a US$750 million dollar military sale to the kingdom by the U.S. Department of Defense in June, according to Reuters. The United Kingdom has also chipped in, to say the least, licensing roughly US$4.2 billion dollars worth of warmongering hardware to Riyadh.

The latest death toll, according to some estimates, exceeds 12,000. It comes amid an escalation in Saudi attacks with their well-serviced war machine financed by the United States, United Kingdom and France, all permanent members of the U.N. Security Council.

Amid the bombing and devastation, which has forced more than a million to flee their homes, Yemen also faces a severe cholera outbreak that has claimed the lives of at least 2,119 people, according to Alexandre Faite, head of the International Committee of the Red Cross. Another eight million are on the verge of starvation.

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