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  • Rage coursed  through waves of protesters earlier this week who smashed the glass doors and painted the walls of federal property in a call for justice an end to impunity.

    Rage coursed  through waves of protesters earlier this week who smashed the glass doors and painted the walls of federal property in a call for justice an end to impunity. | Photo: EFE

Published 16 August 2019

“We travel daily with the fear that when we leave home we will be harassed in the streets, harassed in public transport, work, or school," a petition from protesters read.

Women stood on the glitter-covered steps of the state prosecutor’s office (FGE) in Mexico City as protests continue to call for justice for the rape of a 17 year-old-girl by four policemen, along with the thousands of other victims and survivors of gender-based violence in the country that have gone unpunished.

RELATED: 
Mexican Women Protest Alleged Rape of 2 Teen Girls by Police

“We travel daily with the fear that when we leave home we will be harassed in the streets, harassed in public transport, work, or school. Violated by our partners, friends or bosses. Raped by our boyfriends, husbands, parents, brothers , uncles, grandparents or the police themselves," read a petition addressed to all levels of public security, state authorities, and Mexican society in general.

"Harassment, violence, rapes and femicides are human rights abuses that every day, girls and women in Puebla, Mexico and the world live,” the letter said.

Rage coursed  through waves of protesters earlier this week who smashed the glass doors of the Mexico City's Attorney General's Office and dumped buckets of water filled with pink glitter on the Security Minister Jesus Orta Martinez while chanting “justice” and "an end to impunity."

They’ve fearlessly showered glitter, now a symbol of the activism against the recent rapes and violence of women, and slogans across the capital city. Onlookers and Mexican authorities have mocked their form of protest, which has triggered some debate online, with federal officials claiming their actions are “provocation.”

However, many more have defended it, saying “it is not possible to be offended more by pink glitter and a broken door than by a young woman raped by police.”

The demonstrations denounced two recent rape cases. In the first case, a 17-year-old girl accused four policemen of raping her in their patrol car in Azcapotzalco on Aug. 3. 

In the second case, a 16-year-old girl said a policeman raped her in a museum in the city center. 

Attorney General Ernestina Godoy said police officials are waiting for the 17-year-old to identify her alleged attackers, stating, “if there is no identification, there is no reason for them to be separated from their duties.”​​​​​​​

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