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  • “Most people agree, it’s starting with healthcare workers, and frontline workers, but even there, you need to define which of them are at highest risk, and then the elderly, and so on,” the authority said.

    “Most people agree, it’s starting with healthcare workers, and frontline workers, but even there, you need to define which of them are at highest risk, and then the elderly, and so on,” the authority said. | Photo: EFE/EPA/ SRT

Published 15 October 2020
Opinion

The official remarked that although there are about 30 vaccine candidates in phase 3 of its trial, the production will be limited as this is an unprecedented circumstance for international suppliers.

World Health Organization´s Chief Scientist Soumya Swaminathan explained on Thursday that young people wouldn't be able to get a vaccine until 2022 as front line workers and people at higher risk are the priority.

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“There will be a lot of guidance coming out, but I think an average person, a healthy young person, might have to wait until 2022 to get a vaccine,” the official said.

“Most people agree, it’s starting with healthcare workers, and frontline workers, but even there, you need to define which of them are at highest risk, and then the elderly, and so on,” Swaminathan added.

The official remarked that although there are about 30 vaccine candidates in phase 3 of its trial, the production will be limited as this is an unprecedented circumstance for international suppliers.

“Many people are under the misconception that they´ll be able to get a vaccine in early 2021, and the things will back to normal, but it will not be like that. Nobody has ever produced vaccines in the necessary volumes, so in reality, any vaccine that is ready next year will be available in limited quantities,” Swaminathan pointed out.

On the other hand, the official also warned about a new COVID-19 pandemic wave and recalled that an increment in cases is also linked to a rise of the death toll, which government has to consider instead of underestimating mortality rates. 

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