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  • One of Venezuela's opposition leaders, Henrique Capriles talks to the media during a news conference in Caracas Dec. 21, 2015.

    One of Venezuela's opposition leaders, Henrique Capriles talks to the media during a news conference in Caracas Dec. 21, 2015. | Photo: Reuters

Published 27 December 2015

Members of the right-wing coalition are showing further signs of disunity ahead of the swearing in of the new assembly on Jan. 5, 2016.

Members of the Venezuelan opposition, gathered under the Democratic Unity Roundtable, or MUD, coalition, are showing clear signs of division which could reduce the party’s ability to rule the country and capitalize on popular discontent over rising inflation and food shortages.

In an interview with a local newspaper, the right wing governor of Miranda state, Henrique Capriles, branded the violent barricades of 2014, led by incarcerated former politician Leopoldo Lopez a “failure.” Lopez is currently serving a near 14-year sentence for his role promoting violence that left 43 people dead.

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“If we had followed his strategy, we could not have achieved the Dec. 6 victory,” Capriles said.

“I don’t see Leopoldo Lopez as my contender, we both pursue very different things, however he has the right to want to be president.”

Lopez’s father, Leopoldo Lopez Gil, criticized Capriles’ statements on his Twitter account. Every time Capriles speaks about the protests, Lopez Gil said, he “puts another lock” on the cell of his son.

Meanwhile, the coordinator of Lopez’s “Popular Will” political party, Carlos Vecchio, also expressed discontent and criticized Capriles for his comments.

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Several supporters of Lopez retweeted the statements and blasted Capriles, insulting him and accusing him of pursuing self-interested goals.

The opposition candidates of the MUD won a supermajority by securing 112 of the assembly's 167 seats.

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