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  • Tropical storm Alberto has claimed the lives of at least four people and battered several Cuban provinces.

    Tropical storm Alberto has claimed the lives of at least four people and battered several Cuban provinces. | Photo: Photo VIA avn.info.ve

Published 1 June 2018
Opinion

The Cuban ambassador to Venezuela, Rogelio Polanco, expressed gratitude for the assistance, describing it as an act of “brotherhood and solidarity.”

The Venezuelan government has sent 12 tons of humanitarian aid to Cuba after the passage of tropical storm Alberto, which killed at least four people on the island.

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Nestor Reverol, Venezuela's Minister of the Interior, Justice, and Peace, oversaw the shipment of materials and equipment as it left the Simon Bolivar International Airport in Caracas heading for Havana.

"This is a tangible expression of moral, ethical and spiritual support, of the solidarity which characterizes our brotherly people, to keep demonstrating our commitment to Cuba," Reverol said.

Rogelio Polanco, the Cuban ambassador to Venezuela, expressed his gratitude for the assistance, describing it as an act of “brotherhood and solidarity.” He went on to note that the people of Cuba will receive the humanitarian aid “with great satisfaction... This aid is going to those who most need it, at a time when we need this help."

On Wednesday, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro put the measures in motion to assist the Cuban people to cope with the aftermath of the tropical storm as he met with Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel.

Tropical storm Alberto has claimed the lives of at least four people and battered the Cuban provinces of Cienfuegos, Sancti Spiritus, and Villa Clara. According to Xinhua, thousands of people have been evacuated from these regions where crops have been destroyed and bridges severely damaged.

Meteorologists have warned that this year's hurricane season, which officially runs from June 3 to September 30, will be as bad, or worse, than last year's. Researchers at Colorado State University are predicting seven hurricanes, as well as 14 named storms, will form this year.

Meteorologists are also predicting that of the hurricanes; three will fall in the range of category three or five, with a 52 percent chance of a hurricane panning over the Caribbean region. The probability is ten percent higher than last year's estimate.

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