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News > Venezuela

Venezuela Ratifies the Validity of the 1966 Geneva Agreement

  • Venezuela's Chancellor Jorge Arreaza (L) delivers a Note of Protest to Guyana's Charge d'Affaires in Venezuela Robert McKenzie (R). Caracas, Venezuela, Jan. 26, 2021.

    Venezuela's Chancellor Jorge Arreaza (L) delivers a Note of Protest to Guyana's Charge d'Affaires in Venezuela Robert McKenzie (R). Caracas, Venezuela, Jan. 26, 2021. | Photo: Twitter/ @jaarreaza

Published 17 February 2021
Opinion

The Bolivarian nation keeps its will to set a friendly negotiation on the territorial dispute with Guyana over the Essequibo area.

Venezuela's Foreign Affairs Minister Jorge Arreaza on Wednesday recalled the 55th anniversary of the signing of the Geneva Agreement, an international instrument whose purpose is to resolve the dispute between his country and Guyana over the Essequibo area.

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Venezuela and the United Kingdom signed this agreement in 1966, involving Guyana after its independence on May. 26, 1966.

The treaty establishes the basis for the peaceful solution of the border dispute over the territory to the west of the Essequibo River.

The Venezuelan Foreign Affairs Ministry stated that its country has strictly fulfilled the International Law, complying during these 55 years with the principles established in the agreement.

The Bolivarian nation keeps its will to set a friendly negotiation on the territorial dispute with Guyana to reach a satisfactory agreement for both parties.

President Nicolas Maduro's administration asked the Guyanese authorities to keep third parties out of the negotiation to prevent bilateral relations and regional peace from deteriorating.

In April 2018, Guyana took the Essequibo case to the International Court of Justice (ICC) unilaterally. Venezuela rejected such action and recalled that the Geneva Agreement is the only instrument that can guarantee a peaceful solution to the conflict. 

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