• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • HUD Secretary Ben Carson speaks to reporters.

    HUD Secretary Ben Carson speaks to reporters. | Photo: EFE

Published 11 May 2019

Those who are not of eligible immigration status will no longer be able to serve as leaseholders, even if other members of their household are legal residents or citizens.

A new rule has been proposed by the U.S. President Donald Trump's administration Friday, which the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has inferred will lead to the eviction of over 55,000 children with legal residency or citizenship.

RELATED:

Trump Bids to Send Migrants to Democrat-run Sanctuary Cities

The proposed plan seeks to "require the verification of the eligible immigration status of all recipients of [subsidized housing] who are under the age of 62," according to the Federal Register. Those who are not of eligible immigration status will no longer be able to serve as leaseholders, even if other members of their household are legal residents or citizens.

The current policy allows for undocumented individuals with children who are citizens to be eligible for public housing. This would not be the case if the new policy is passed, as it would require every member to be either a legal resident or citizen. 

The proposal was filed by the HUD, which also conducted an analysis of the potential consequences. The department concluded that out of the 108,000 immigrants who currently benefit from subsidized housing, about 25,000 have at least one household member who would not qualify. Children make up about half of these vulnerable households, and would normally qualify for aid due to their legal status. 

Approval measures may now result in numerous families finding themselves homeless. Those who do qualify would end up receiving higher subsidies, which is currently allocated based on the percentage of eligible household members, since each member of the household would be of legal status. 

The households currently considered "mixed" status also pay higher rent. Some experts say that the status assignment could potentially end up costing the federal government millions more. To avoid extra expenditure, the department would most likely have to "reduce the quantity and quality of assisted housing." 

HUD Secretary Ben Carson, meanwhile, is attempting to drive the selling-point that the policy would benefit low-income U.S. families who could gain from the newly vacated homes. However, president and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, Diane Yentel, says the benefits would be diminished. Yentel expressed that "the cruelty of it is really breathtaking and it would do real harm to kids and to families and for what?"

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.