• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
News > U.S.

US: Impeachment of Trump Will Go To the Senate After January 20

  • The House voted to impeach President Trump for inciting an insurrection ahead of the Capitol riot attack. Trump is the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice, but a Senate vote is needed to convict him.

    The House voted to impeach President Trump for inciting an insurrection ahead of the Capitol riot attack. Trump is the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice, but a Senate vote is needed to convict him. | Photo: Twitter/@ajplus

Published 14 January 2021
Opinion

There will not be a session on this issue in the upper chamber before the new president takes office next week.

After the House of Representatives approved a formal indictment of outgoing U.S. President Donald Trump the day before, the process now moves to the Senate, where Republican leaders have ruled out an "express" process.

What Trump did "again" in his term is to be the protagonist of an impeachment, making him the first U.S. president to be subjected to two charges in the Senate, something that is unprecedented.

RELATED:

US House of Representatives Votes to Impeach President Trump

The only charge against the occupying White House magnate will be "inciting insurrection" for the events of January 6 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, when mobs instigated by Donald Trump forcibly disrupted the certification of the new President Joe Biden.

The trial will take place after the president leaves office next Wednesday. If Trump is convicted, senators could also vote to bar him from holding public office again. The prosecution will be supported by nine Democratic representatives, who will act as prosecutors.

The Republican president has rejected his responsibility for the violence. In a video released by the White House after the vote, in the absence of social networks, from which he was suspended, he asked his supporters to remain peaceful, without mentioning his impeachment.

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said that "there was simply no possibility that a fair or serious trial" could be concluded given "the rules, procedures, and precedents of the Senate" that govern trials involving presidents.

A two-thirds majority would be needed to convict Trump, meaning that at least 17 Republicans would have to vote with Democrats in the 100-seat chamber, divided equally.

Up to 20 Republicans are open to condemning the president, the New York Times reported Tuesday. In a note to his colleagues, McConnell said he had not decided how he would vote at this time.

If Trump is convicted, senators could hold another vote to prevent him from running for office again, which he has indicated he plans to do in 2024. The House indicted Trump in 2020 for his dealings with Ukraine, but the Senate acquitted him then, a scenario that is not expected to be repeated at this time, following recent events.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.