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  • There are roughly 5,000 different Indigenous groups with approximately 185 million native women around the world.

    There are roughly 5,000 different Indigenous groups with approximately 185 million native women around the world. | Photo: EFE

Published 6 September 2018

“The empowerment of Indigenous women is not only a central issue but also a necessary condition to eradicate hunger," the U.N. said.

Thirty South American leaders have been invited to join the United Nations Organization for Food and Agriculture (FAO) in its global campaign for the empowerment of Indigenous women.

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In its most recent campaign, #IndigenousWomen, Visible Women, the FAO, together with the International Forum of Indigenous Women and the News Agency for Indigenous and Afro-descendant Women, highlighted the difficulties and discrimination native women face around the world.

“The empowerment of Indigenous women is not only a central issue but also a necessary condition to eradicate hunger and malnutrition in the world. For this, it is essential to raise awareness about the contributions of Indigenous women to the consequences of Zero Hunger and to involve all interested parties in the elimination of the barriers that prevent them from fully enjoying their rights,” the U.N. affiliate said in its online campaign.

There are roughly 5,000 different Indigenous groups with approximately 185 million native women, and despite the developments and technology accessible to society, thousands continue to struggle with hunger and extreme poverty.

"The #DíaMujeresIndígenas appears in homage to Bartoli, an Aymara woman who fought against oppression."

"It is incredible that there is triple discrimination; many people are discriminated against because they are women, poor, and Indigenous,” said Mexican chef and TV personality, Alfredo Oropeza, who has supported the movement openly.

“They are the guardians of wisdom, protectors of seeds, and ancestral rituals, Unfortunately, they are the most unprotected. It is necessary that we value them and exalt their legacy by making them visible,” the culinary star said.

The presence of a “violet chair” at the FAO headquarters, introduced Wednesday in honor of the International Indigenous Women’s Day, is a subtle reminder of the critical role indigenous women play in society and the fight against hunger.

Other international celebrities who’ve aligned themselves with the cause are Uruguay’s Chef Rodolfo “Chapori” Angenscheidt,  Salvadoran Chef Francisco Arevalos, Panama’s chef Mario Castellon, Costa Rican singer Debi Nova, Paraguayás soccer star Nelson Haedo, and Chilean TV presenter, Polo Ramirez.

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