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  • A Sudanese protester holds a national flag as he stands on a barricade along a street, demanding that the country's Transitional Military Council hand over power to civilians, in Khartoum

    A Sudanese protester holds a national flag as he stands on a barricade along a street, demanding that the country's Transitional Military Council hand over power to civilians, in Khartoum | Photo: Reuters

Published 5 June 2019

After the "massacre" perpetrated against protesters on Monday, the military seems to be taking a step back.

The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors, a medical arm of the Sudanese Professionals Association which has been leading protests in Sudan, said Wednesday the death toll has jumped to 60 people with hundreds more wounded since the latest military crackdown on protests. 

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Civil society groups name what is currently happening in their country a “bloody massacre” and among international concerns, the U.N. firmly condemned the killings.

Protester’s leaders called for “total civil disobedience” to overthrow the military council and accused the paramilitary group The Rapid Support Forces of being behind the crackdown.

Hospitals in the capital city of Sudan Khartoum said they are struggling to cope with the number of wounded "The situation is very difficult. Most of the hospitals have taken in more casualties than they have capacity for," a doctor who works at two hospitals in the city stated before adding "There's a shortage of medical staff, a shortage of blood, and it's difficult to do surgery because some operations can only be done in certain hospitals".

Sudan’s military had evicted ex-president Omar al-Bashir on April after months of protests against his 30 years of authoritarian rule and had announced initially a-three-years transition period to a civil administration, which has not been accepted by the civilian movements behind the protests. 

After Monday’s crackdown, army ruler General Abdel-Fattah Burhan said the agreement was canceled and elections would take place in nine months.

However, following Monday's events, the general appeared using a calmer tone, saying the military regretted the latest “events” and are ready to talk on the country’s future. 

"We in the military council open our arms to negotiate with no restriction but the national interest to continue building a legitimate power that reflects the aspirations of the Sudanese revolution in every way," Burhan said on Wednesday on television.

European African countries have criticized the violent army attacks against demonstrators. While African countries condemned the military’s election plan, most Arab countries, led by Saudi Arabia and Egypt, are for their part, backing the military rulers.

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