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  • Civilians hold their national flag as they celebrate the signing of the Sudan's power sharing deal, in Khartoum.

    Civilians hold their national flag as they celebrate the signing of the Sudan's power sharing deal, in Khartoum. | Photo: Reuters

Published 20 August 2019

The new 11-member body will steer the country for three years until elections can be held to transition into complete civilian rule.

Sudanese generals and protest leaders finalized the creation of a new, joint ruling body after the Transitional Military Council (TMC) was dismantled. The TMC came to power after the ousting of longtime ruler Omar al-Bashir in April in the aftermath of week-long massive protests against his regime.

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The new body is constituted of 11 members who will drive the country for three years until elections can be held for a complete transition to civilian rule.

Names of the members were announced on Tuesday on television by the spokesman of the TMC, Shamseddine Kabbashi.

The council will include six civilians and five military members and will be conducted for 21 months by General Abdel-Fattah Burhan who was also at the head of the TMC. A civilian leader chosen by the protest movement will then steer the body and the country for the remaining 18 months.

"The president of the sovereign council will be sworn in Wednesday,” Kabbashi said.

Last week, the country’s main opposition alliance nominated Abdalla Hamdok, a former United Nations economist, to be the prime minister in the transitional government. He will also be formally appointed on Wednesday.

Among the council members named by the protest movement are two women, one of them from Sudan's Christian Coptic minority.

The transition's documents were signed on Saturday at a ceremonial attended by several foreign officials. However, despite the optimism and exaltation that are accompanying the promise of a civilian rule, some civilian activists aren't celebrating just yet. One reason is the presence of Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, also known as Hemedti, in the new ruling body. Hemedti commands the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces, some of whom are accused of being involved in the mass killing of demonstrators in June, post-coup. 

Sudanese women, who played a leading role in the protests, have also expressed their disconcert at the absence of women on the newly formed council.

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