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  • A study published in July showed that one-third of Latino children in the United States live in poverty.

    A study published in July showed that one-third of Latino children in the United States live in poverty. | Photo: EFE

Published 11 September 2015

Many Black and Latino households are forced to cut down and skip meals, sometimes not eating for a whole day. 

Black and Latino households in the U.S. are more likely than their white counterparts to not have enough money or resources to cover the basic cost of food, a new report finds.

In 2014, 6.9 million households, or 5.6 percent of U.S. households, suffered from food insecurity, according to a new report released earlier this week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Black (26.1 percent) and Latino (22.4 percent) households disproportionately make up those who were forced to either reduce or disrupt normal eating patterns from lack of resources.

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According to the study, food insecurity in practice looks like cutting down on and skipping meals, not eating for a whole day, not having enough money to buy food, and worrying that food will run out before there is enough money to buy more.

Although children suffer from food insecurity in 3.7 million households, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack believes the report is a positive sign. Security is “the strongest it's been since before the Recession" he told NBC, arguing "two million fewer people live in a state of food insecurity today compared to 2011."

Food insecurity is also prevalent in 35.3 percent of single mother households, in contrast to that of single men with 21.7 percent. 

The racial-gap found by the study adds to the mounting number of reports that confirm Black and Latino communities are disproportionately impacted by poverty.

According to a Pew Research Center report released in July, Black children were almost four times as likely as white or Asian children to live in poverty in 2013.

Another study also published in July showed that one-third of Latino children in the United States live in poverty.
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