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  • The laptop can be easily disassembled for upgrading purposes, therefore making it more sustainable and long-lasting.

    The laptop can be easily disassembled for upgrading purposes, therefore making it more sustainable and long-lasting. | Photo: EFE

Published 4 September 2019

The innovation comes amid growing discontent against the planned obsolescence electronic companies use to boost sales at the expense of natural resources and a biodiverse ecosystem.

A family of Peruvian entrepreneurs has launched an eco-friendly and low-cost laptop that is designed to last between 10 and 15 years and give marginalized populations greater access to technology, amid growing discontent against the planned obsolescence electronic companies use to boost sales at the expense of natural resources and a biodiverse ecosystem.

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Developed by a family of socially-conscious professionals, the Wawalaptop combines a green design with free software to create a computer aimed at extending the access of new technologies to the Andean nation's most remote areas and poor communities.

The Carrasco family developed their first low-cost computer in 2015, taking it to different parts of the Amazon and testing the product with children. Then the company updated the computer to the Wawalaptop 2.0, a 10.1-inch laptop whose body is made out of recyclable fiberboard.

It can be easily disassembled for upgrading purposes, therefore making it more sustainable and long-lasting.

The innovation comes amid growing discontent against the planned obsolescence electronic companies use to boost sales at the expense of natural resources and a biodiverse ecosystem.

Planned obsolescence among tech firms has never been proven as a systematic practice but the evidence is mounting among growing concerns over the end of natural resources.

In January last year, Italy's anti-trust body filed a lawsuit against Apple and Samsung, suspected of orchestrating “a general commercial policy taking advantage of the lack of certain components to curb the performance times of their products and induce consumers to buy new versions,” the Italian watchdog said.

Apple acknowledged last month that iPhone software had the effect of slowing down some phones with battery problems, but denied that it had ever done anything to intentionally shorten the life of a product.

Lawsuits have been filed against Apple in California, New York, and Illinois alleging the company defrauded users by slowing down devices without warning.​​​​​​​ The company also faces a legal complaint in France, where so-called “planned obsolescence” is against the law.

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